Cervical Cancer Prevention Week takes place between 23 – 29 January 2023. This year the charity Jo’s Cervical Cancer Trust is launching the End Cervical Cancer Campaign.

As a medical negligence solicitor, and through supporting clients, I see first-hand the effects cervical cancer has on those diagnosed with the disease and their families. Often clients have sadly suffered a delay in diagnosis and treatment and are left not only needing answers but also access to specialist care, support, or further treatments which is funded through compensation.  

More than 3000 new cases of cervical cancer

Recent data from Cancer Research UK shows there were 3,197 new cases of cervical cancer diagnosed between 2016-2018. It's most commonly diagnosed in women aged between 30 and 34.

During Cervical Cancer Prevention Week, Irwin Mitchell is working with Jo’s Trust to raise awareness of signs of the disease. We're supporting its campaign to promote people attending cervical screening appointments and have the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.  

Cervical screening  

Part of the cervical smear or screening programme intends to prevent cervical cancer by establishing if people have the HPV virus or signs of early changes in cells that could indicate cancer. It aims to treat early to avoid the cancer developing or progressing. 

HPV

Over 99% cases of cervical cancer cases are caused by HPV. In September 2008, the HPV vaccine was rolled out to girls in school and since 2019 has been rolled out to all girls and boys at school.

The Cancer Research data indicates the incidence rate of cervical cancer has reduced by 25% since the 1990s, indicating the introduction of the HPV vaccine and the great work Jo’s Trust do to support people with their cervical screening is having an impact.

However, it's vital that work to reduce the incidence rate continues and people don't become complacent. Early diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer is key.

Client shares her cervical cancer story to help others

Our client Sarah McDonald (pictured) has shared her story of her diagnosis and treatment and the importance of cervical screening in a podcast with Irwin Mitchell.

Sarah speaks about her experience, how she told her children she had cancer and raises awareness to reduce the worries some women may have and encourages us all to seek medical attention if we are worried, have the HPV vaccine and attend our cervical screenings.

Support is available

It's common for women to feel reluctant to attend cervical smears but the importance of attending can't be overstated. If you're feeling nervous or worried about smears reach out to Jo’s Trust on its website - where there are a number of resources to support people of all ages in attending cervical screening -  or via the charity's helpline 0808 802 8000.

Find out more about Irwin Mitchell's expertise in supporting people and families affected by cancer at our dedicated cancer claims section.